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It’s not often you find a song that made it through the editing process with an error in it, but sometimes it happens– and like a defective coin minting, it becomes all the more valuable for its flaws.

The song in question is Some Folks from an est. 1945 radio transcription. Written by Stephen Foster in 1855, it’s one of those old classics that listeners of the Pioneers’ radio shows would easily recognize.

The error comes when Ken Carson sings the second verse, and he does it so smoothly and naturally that no one seems to have noticed, and the take made it onto the transcription reels. The lyrics of the verse are “Some folks like to sigh, some folks do, some folks do/others long to die, but that’s not me nor you”

But Ken sings “some folks like to sigh, some folks do, some folks do/others like to die…” The one misplaced word is subtle, but affects the whole meaning of the song.

Here are the full lyrics as sung in the radio transcription:

[Ken Carson solo]  Some folks like to sigh,
Some folks do, some folks do;
Others long to die,
But that’s not me nor you.
Chorus:
Long live the merry merry heart
That laughs by night and day,
Like the Queen of Mirth,
No matter what some folks say.

[Bob Nolan] Some folks fear to smile,
Some folks do, some folks do;
Others laugh through guile,
But that’s not me nor you.
Chorus

[Hugh Farr] Some folks toil and save,
Some folks do, some folks do;
To buy themselves a grave,
But that’s not me nor you.
Chorus

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